Archive for September, 2014

Combating Client-Inflicted Workplace Violence among Direct Care Workers

Posted by on September 25th, 2014 at 3:30 am | 4 Comments »
Shelly S. McDowell-Porter

Shelly S. McDowell-Porter

Greetings! I am the proud daughter, granddaughter, niece, cousin, and friend of many direct care paraprofessionals (DCPs), the term I am using for my PhD project on frontline workers such as home health attendants, home health aides, certified nursing assistants, and personal care assistants. I am also a licensed clinical social worker and a PhD student at the Howard University School of Social Work in Washington D.C. If you are a direct care worker, I need your help to complete a survey on client-Inflicted workplace violence for my doctoral thesis.

My doctoral research is a tribute to the women in my family, who did the hard work of caring for others in order to care for their loved ones. It focuses on client-inflicted workplace violence, the victimization of DCPs at the hands of their clients or their client’s family members. Workplace violence comes in many forms, including (but not limited to) physical assault, sexual assault, verbal abuse, and emotional abuse. Continue reading »

How My DCA Blog Post Won Me a Car

Posted by on September 16th, 2014 at 1:45 pm | Comments Off on How My DCA Blog Post Won Me a Car

Chevy Prizm keysOn a Treadmill Going Backward, my Direct Care Alliance blog post about how hard it is to get by on a home care worker’s wages, is developing a life of its own.

Right after it was published, Steve Farnham of the Aroostock Area Agency on Aging asked permission to give copies to legislators and legislative candidates “to support an effort to increase wages and promote benefits for direct care workers in Maine.” The Maine Peoples Alliance asked me to read the essay on their Town Hall telecommunication system last month—to about 10,000 people!  On Labor Day I gave a copy to Mike Michaud, who is running for governor of Maine.  And I will be reading the story at the Kennebec Valley Organization’s Candidate night on September 18.

Meanwhile, Jack Hayes, who read and commented on my blog post, was inspired to offer me the most amazing gift.  Continue reading »

Direct Care Workers in the News

Posted by on September 15th, 2014 at 2:55 pm | Comments Off on Direct Care Workers in the News

Maine needs to increase reimbursement rates and give us direct care workers a raise, says Helen Hanson in a Bangor Daily News editorial.

How negative public attitudes toward direct care work can damage workers’ morale and self-image.

Not just anyone can do direct care work, says a striking worker: “It takes a very long time to understand how to work with very complex people with very complex needs.”

A strong op-ed on what’s wrong with Britain’s “zero-hour” home care contracts, which offer workers no protection and no guaranteed hours.

With a statewide average wage of $8.60 an hour, home care workers in Missouri are calling for higher wages.

An ethics instructor considers what fair pay for home care workers would look like—and why we need to make it happen.

This video for NADSP’s Direct Support Professional Appreciation Week (September 7-13) celebrates the work done by DSPs.

Professors Lisa Dodson and Nancy Folbre on why the Supreme Court’s Harris v. Quinn decision will hurt home care consumers.

Continue reading »

Surveying Workplace Hazards for Home Care Workers

Posted by on September 3rd, 2014 at 3:24 pm | Comments Off on Surveying Workplace Hazards for Home Care Workers
Patricia Buckley

Patricia Buckley

Most Americans can go to work each day with confidence because their workplace is regulated for safety, but this is not the case for those who work in a private home. There are currently no provisions to address workplace safety for home care workers, and that makes it difficult to create a stable and predictable work environment. No wonder home health care and personal care always rank among the occupations with the highest rates of job-related injuries on Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

An unsafe workplace not only endangers the aides who work there but undermines their ability to support the client. For example, home care workers often face scenarios like this:  Continue reading »